Assisted Living Communities Washington DC

Assisted living communities are a place where people can comfortably reside while receiving assistance with their every day activities.  Many families look into assisted living communities when trying to take care of aging loved ones. The communities ensure to make the environment feel like home for the patient. Although assisted living can offer medication assistance they do not offer complex medical services. Below you’ll find out local assisted living communites in Washington, DC. 

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
(202) 690-8267
330 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, DC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
Human Touch Home Health Care Agency, Inc.
(202) 483-9111
1416 9th Street N.W.
Washington, DC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
COPE
(202) 628-5100
1120 G Street, NW
Washington, DC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
Howard University Hospital
(202) 865-6650
2041 Georgia Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
Care South Health Services
(202) 293-4300
2020 Pennsylvania Avenue
Washington, DC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
J B Johnson Nursing Center
(202) 535-2055
901 First Street Nw
Washington, DC
Services
Nursing Home Services

Data Provided By:
Modern Healthcare
(202) 662-7207
814 National Press Building
Washington, DC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
Health Management, Inc.
(202) 887-8110
1707 L Street NW
Washington, DC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
Healthwork Solutions, Inc.
(202) 290-2703
418 10th Street SE, Suite 2A
Washington, DC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
ASAP Services Corporation
(202) 293-2931
201 15th Street SE
Washington, DC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Social and Human Service Assistants

  • A high school diploma is the minimum educational requirement, but employers often seek individuals with relevant work experience or education beyond high school.
  • Employment is projected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations.
  • Job opportunities should be excellent, particularly for applicants with appropriate postsecondary education; but wages remain low.

Nature of the Work About this section

Social and human service assistants help social workers, healthcare workers, and other professionals to provide services to people. Social and human service assistant is a generic term for workers with a wide array of job titles, including human service worker, case management aide, social work assistant, community support worker, mental health aide, community outreach worker, life skills counselor, social services aide, youth worker, psychological aide, client advocate, or gerontology aide. They usually work under the direction of workers from a variety of fields, such as nursing, psychiatry, psychology, or social work. The amount of responsibility and supervision they are given varies a great deal. Some have little direct supervision. For example, they may run a group home. Others work under close direction.

Social and human service assistants provide services to clients to help them improve their quality of life. They assess clients' needs, investigate their eligibility for benefits and services such as food stamps, Medicaid and welfare, and help clients obtain them. They also arrange for transportation, if necessary, and provide emotional support. They monitor and keep case records on clients and report progress to supervisors and case managers.

Social and human service assistants play a variety of roles in the community. For example, they may organize and lead group activities, assist clients in need of counseling or crisis intervention, or administer food banks or emergency fuel programs. In halfway houses, group homes, and government-supported housing programs, they assist adults who need supervision with personal hygiene and daily living tasks. They review clients' records, ensure that they take prescribed medication, talk with family members, and confer with medical personnel and other caregivers to provide insight into clients' needs. Assistants also give emotional support and help clients become involved in community recreation programs and other activities.

In psychiatric hospitals, rehabilitation programs, and outpatient clinics, social and human service assistants work with psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and others to help clients master everyday living skills, communicate more effectively, and live well with others. They support the client's participation in a treatment plan, such as individual or group counseling or occupational therapy.

The work, while satisfying, can be emotionally draining. Understaffing and relatively low pay can add to the pressure.

Work environment. Working conditions of social and human service assistants vary. Some work in offices, clinics, and hospitals, while others work in group homes, shelters, and day programs. Traveling to see clients is required for some jobs. Sometimes working with clients can be dangerous, even though most agencies do everything they can to ensure their workers' safety. Some work in the evening and on weekends.

Social and human service assistants help social workers, healthcare workers, and other professionals to provide services to people.
Social and human service assistants help social workers, healthcare workers, and other professionals to provide services to people.

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement About this section

A high school diploma is the minimum education requirement, but employers often seek individuals with relevant work experience or education beyond high school.

Education and training. Many employers prefer to hire people with some education beyond high school. Certificates or associate degrees in subjects such as human services, gerontology or one of the social or behavioral sciences meet many employers' requirements. Some jobs may require a bachelor's or master's degree in human services or a related field, such as counseling, rehabilitation, or social work.

Human services degree programs have a core curriculum that trains students to observe patients and record information, conduct patient interviews, implement treatment plans, employ problem-solving techniques, handle crisis intervention matters, and use proper case management and referral procedures. Many programs utilize field work to give students hands-on experience. General education courses in liberal arts, sciences, and the humanities also are part of most curriculums. Most programs also offer specialized courses related to addictions, gerontology, child protection, and other areas. Many degree programs require completion of a supervised internship.

Workers level of education often determines the kind of work they are assigned and the degree of responsibility that is given to them. For example, workers with no more than a high school education are likely to work in direct-care services and helping clients to fill out paperwork. They may receive extensive on-the-job training on how to perform these tasks. Workers with a college degree, however, might do supportive counseling, coordinate program activities, or manage a group home. Social and human service assistants with proven leadership ability, especially acquired from paid or volunteer experience in social services, often have greater autonomy in their work. Regardless of the academic or work background of employees, most employers provide some form of in-service training, such as seminars and workshops, to their employees.

Other qualifications. These workers should have a strong desire to help others, effective communication skills, a sense of responsibility, and the ability to manage time effectively. Many human services jobs involve direct contact with people who are vulnerable to exploitation or mistreatment; so patience and understanding are also highly valued characteristics.

It is becoming more common for employers to require a criminal background check, and in some settings, workers may be required to have a valid driver's license.

Advancement. Formal education is almost always necessary for advancement. In general, advancement to case management, or social work jobs requires a bachelor's or master's degree in human services, counseling, rehabilitation, social work, or a related field.

Employment About this section

Social and human service assistants held about 352,000 jobs in 2008. More than 65 percent were employed in the healthcare and social assistance industries and almost 24 percent were employed by State and local governments.

Job Outlook About this section

Employment of social and human service assistants is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations. Job prospects are expected to be excellent , particularly for applicants with relevant postsecondary education.

Employment change. The number of social and human service assistants is expected to grow by nearly 23 percent between 2008 and 2018, which is much faster than the average for all occupations. This is due in large part to the aging population and increased demand for mental health and substance abuse treatment.

As the elderly population continues to grow, the demand for social and human service assistants will expand. This is due in large part to the increased need for social services demanded by this population, such as adult day care, meal delivery programs and support during medical crises. Social and human service assistants, who assist in locating and providing these services, will be needed to meet this increased demand.

Opportunities are expected to be good in private social service agencies. Employment in private agencies will grow, as State and local governments continue to contract out services to the private sector in an effort to cut costs.

The number of jobs for social and human service assistants in State and local governments will grow, but not as fast as employment for social and human service assistants in other industries. Employment in the public sector may fluctuate with the level of funding provided by State and local governments and with the number of services contracted out to private organizations.

Job prospects. Job prospects for social and human service assistants are expected to be excellent, particularly for individuals with appropriate education after high school. Job openings will come from job growth, but also from the need to replace workers, who advance into new positions, retire, or leave the workforce for other reasons. There will be more competition for jobs in urban areas than in rural ones, but qualified applicants should have little difficulty finding employment.

Projections Data About this section

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Projections data from the National Employment Matrix

Occupational Title

SOC Code

Employment, 2008

Projected
Employment, 2018

Change,
2008-18

Detailed Statistics

Number

Percent

Social and human service assistants

21-1093

352,000

431,500

79,400

23

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    NOTE: Data in this table are rounded. See the discussion of the employment projections table in the Handbook introductory chapter on Occupational Information Included in the Handbook .