Estate Planner Washington DC

Estate Planners in Washington, DC are attorneys that provide legal, as well as tax counsel and aid. They provide many different services, mainly in regards to wills, trusts, beneficiary appointments, and powers of appointment. Below you will find a list of Estate Planners in your local area.

Sarah Blackburn Albertson
1001 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW OFFICE BLDG
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Tax, Estate Planning, Litigation
Education
Harvard University Law School,Cornell University
State Licensing
DC

Abraham C Blitzer
419 7TH ST NW
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Criminal Defense, Probate, Estate Planning, Family
State Licensing
DC, Maryland

Thomas W Richardson
(202) 942-5171
1001 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW OFFICE BLDG
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Tax, Estate Planning
Education
University of Vermont,Rutgers University School of Law
State Licensing
DC

George E Covucci
1001 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW OFFICE BLDG
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Real Estate, Tax, Estate Planning, Bankruptcy
Education
Georgetown University Law Center,City College of New York
State Licensing
DC

Olekanma A Ekekwe
717 D ST NW
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Domestic Violence, Child Custody, Education, Estate Planning, Elder Law, Family, Alimony, Prenuptials
Education
University of Maryland, Baltimore County,University of the District of Columbia, David A. Clarke Sch
State Licensing
DC

Richard L Hubbard
(202) 942-5755
1001 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW OFFICE BLDG
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Tax, Estate Planning, Workers Compensation, Employee Benefits
Education
Harvard University Law School,Williams College
State Licensing
DC

Douglas L Siegler
(202) 383-0220
1275 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW OFFICE BLDG
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Tax, Estate Planning
Education
Duke University School of Law,Princeton University
State Licensing
DC, Maryland

Bryan J Tomasek
1001 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW OFFICE BLDG
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Corporate, Investment Fraud, Real Estate, Tax, Estate Planning
Education
Georgetown University Law Center,University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
State Licensing
DC

Douglas Benson
(202) 383-0252
1275 Pennsylvania Avenue Nw
Washington, DC
Specialties
Estate Planning, Trusts, Tax
State Licensing
DC

Edward S Desmarais Jr
1001 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW OFFICE BLDG
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Tax, Estate Planning, Administrative Law
Education
University of Florida, Levin College of Law,University of Florida
State Licensing
DC

The 529 College Savings Plan as an Estate Planning Move



Let’s take a brief look at the 529-college savings plan as an estate-planning move. A 529 plan is not merely just a great vehicle to fund your child or grandchild’s future. A 529 plan is an excellent tool to remove money from your taxable estate. This will assist you in lowering your tax liability and keeping intact more of your estate for your loved ones once you pass.

All 50 states and the District of Columbia now offer some type of 529 savings plans. A 529 plan is a state sponsored savings plan that invests money on behalf of beneficiaries. The earnings are tax deferred from federal income tax and most states have programs that will defer state taxes. If your beneficiary uses the money from this fund for any qualified education purpose, the withdrawals will be free of tax.

There is a lot of competition between states that has lead to very large contribution limits. This is good news for you as you plan your estate. 529’s have extremely simple investment options- age based and individual portfolios. Basically, these college savings plans afford the family the ability to transfer wealth from generation to generation, free of income, estate and gift taxation.

So what makes a 529 college savings plan so attractive to an estate planner? They do not have any income limits unlike the educational IRAs. Almost everyone can qualify for a 529. And if you’re looking for a way to reduce your estate tax bill, this is a great solution. Take advantage of $11,000 in annual tax-free gift contributions. If you’re married that means you can contribute up to $22,000 for each beneficiary in one year. This is free from federal gift tax penalties. It is advisable to look into your state laws on gift planning for 529’s as they vary.



If you need to reduce the size of your estate you could contribute up to $60,000 (five years worth of gifts) in year one of a five-year period. Or if you’re married you can contribute up to $120,000. This is a good resource to transfer wealth by reducing the size of your estate and do away with estate taxes.

The account owner is always in charge of the plan’s assets. Even though the monies added are considered gifts, the owner does keep control. The donors can even take back the money for themselves or transfer the account to another beneficiary. If the owner of a 529 account were to die, the value of the account would not be counted in the estate. The account value would be in the beneficiary’s estate. The exception to this would be if you had made the 5-year election and passed before the 5 years was over. Then, the part of the contribution that was assigned to the years after your death would be included in your federal gross estate.

It is also very easy to move the money in an account through 529 rollovers or by changing your beneficiary. If you have a need to distribute your estate, you can set up 529 plans for a large array of family members. This includes children, siblings, grandchildren, uncles, aunts, stepfamily, cousins and so forth.

If you need to transfer wealth, look into 529 plans as part of your estate planning strategy. At the very least, the 529 college savings plan, as an estate-planning move is something to discuss in more depth with your tax professional. This is an extremely generous gift for your beneficiary. Imagine the reward of knowing you've provided someone with the gift of an education.