Real Estate Attorney Washington DC

Local resource for real estate attorneys in Washington, DC. Find helpful information about real estate law and real estate transactions, as well as listings for real estate attorneys who can provide the legal services you need.

Peter W Segal
901 NEW YORK AVE NW FL 3
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Commercial, Residential, Real Estate, Antitrust
Education
Boston University School of Law,Tufts University
State Licensing
DC

Aleksandar Dukic
1001 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW OFFICE BLDG
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Immigration, International Law, Government, Residential, Investment Fraud
Education
Belgrade University Law School,George Washington University National Law Center,The Richard Stockton
State Licensing
DC

Stephen I Holmquist
(202) 349-2462
455 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Suite 400
Washington, DC
Specialties
Federal Regulation, Residential, Public Finance
Education
Harvard University Law School,Harvard University,University of Pennsylvania
State Licensing
DC, Massachusetts

Ronald S Gart
901 NEW YORK AVE NW FL 3
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Commercial, Residential, Public Finance, Construction, Real Estate
Education
The George Washington University, The National Law Center,George Washington University
State Licensing
DC

Dimitri J Nionakis
(202) 383-7215
1299 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC
Specialties
Litigation, Antitrust, Commercial, Investment Fraud, Residential
Education
Case Western Reserve University,Middlebury College
State Licensing
DC, Massachusetts

Mark D. Jackson
(404) 853-8438
1275 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC
Specialties
Real Estate, Residential, Commercial
Education
Emory University
State Licensing
DC, Georgia

Marianne R Casserly
(202) 756-3379
950 F ST NW
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Litigation, Residential, Telecommunications, Commercial
Education
Catholic University of America,St Francis College
State Licensing
DC

Megan Glasheen
(202) 349-2454
455 Massachusetts Ave Nw #400
Washington, DC
 
Arthur B Axelson
(202) 414-9223
1301 K Street Nw, Suite 1100 East Tower
Washington, DC
Specialties
Advertising, Banking, Residential
State Licensing
DC

Richard M Lucas
1001 PENNSYLVANIA AVE NW OFFICE BLDG
WASHINGTON, DC
Specialties
Mergers & Acquisitions, Financial Markets And Services, Litigation, Residential, Business
Education
Yale Law School,Georgetown University McDonough School of Business
State Licensing
DC

How to Find a Lawyer and What to Pay Him For

Lawyer Feature

By Ronald L. Zambrano, Esquire

My daddy is a movie actor, and sometimes he plays the good guy, and sometimes he plays the lawyer." - Malcolm Ford, of his actor father, Harrison Ford.

Everybody hates lawyers until they need one. I am sorry to be blunt, but if you have something to lose, protect or gain, you would be stupid not to consult a lawyer.

Have Realistic Expectations - You Still Won’t Afford a Maserati


There are few things more annoying to a lawyer than a client with unreasonable expectations. Just because you got fired, slipped on baby vomit in a Macy’s, or a truck flipped over your car, doesn’t mean you hit the lottery. The guy that got millions of dollars in the Larry H. Parker commercials is in a wheelchair for the rest of his life. Would you really exchange paralysis for a million dollars?

A majority of people seek out an attorney because they feel wronged. For those of you in that category please understand: You must have suffered a legally recognizable loss, otherwise known as damages.

What the hell does that mean? When you’ve suffered a loss that can be remedied through the legal system, the system will do its best to make you whole by attributing a dollar amount to what you’ve lost.

For example, in a car accident, you can suffer more than one kind of loss. The loss associated with the damage to your vehicle. Another loss is that associated with any medical attention you paid for as a result (e.g., emergency room services to future treatment). Still another type of loss is any associated with the whole ordeal. Let’s not forget the famous “pain and suffering,” nor the equally infamous (yet rarely given) punitive damages.

True story : I was driving on the 101 East when an 18-wheeler clipped my rear driver side. I spun 360 degrees, hit the curb, flipped upside down, and slid down the embankment. The firefighters told me I missed a pole by a yard. I walked away without a scratch (thank you Volkswagen!), but my car was totaled. I was scared, angry and irate because this truck didn’t even stop! I wanted to get medieval on the trucking company, but it didn’t work that way. All I was entitled to was the damage to my car. Why? I didn’t suffer any other loss. I was able to go to work, as I didn’t suffer any physical injury. I was pissed, but not enough to warrant a plausible demand for pain and suffering. The fair market of my car before it performed a vault routine was all I was entitled to, because that made me whole.

You get the picture. From one single accident, there are various forms of loss you can demand compensation for, only if you’ve suffered them. When you’ve suffered a loss that can be...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Primer Magazine

Real Estate Investment: Law Everywhere



Apart from possibly medicine, there's no area of human endeavor more intricately intertwined with legal trappings than Real Estate. Because of the larger amounts of money involved, and the centrality of property for living and carrying out so many commercial transactions, the rules have become complicated and many hands are in the pie.

The history of property law goes back millennia, to at least the Sumerians in 3000 BC — and it's been evolving ever since. Every aspect of property is ruled by a dizzying array of laws worldwide. Financing, buying and selling, tenancy and use, environmental aspects, tax considerations, even defining where and what is property is governed by laws, many of which are as clear as coffee.

But for the investor it's essential for long-term profitability to gain a healthy familiarity with property-related law.

One good place to start is: The Contract.

In any real estate contract there must be 'mutual assent'. Each party has to agree to an exchange — in writing. The old saw is true: a verbal agreement isn't worth the paper it's written on.

The contract has to identify who those parties are and the property being exchanged and for how much. And to be enforceable, consideration — the benefit that induces a promise — must exist. Then the contract has to be signed by parties of legal age and sound mind. This latter must be loosely defined, given the inherent insanity of real estate investing as a business.



As part of the consideration aspect, the property itself must be worth what the seller and lenders claim, as determined (at least approximately) by appraisals and other means.

Flipping (buying and rapidly re-selling property) for example, is perfectly legal —— until an unscrupulous investor buys a cheap, run down property and conspires with a mortgage broker to doctor documents to bring an inflated price. When government bodies guarantee the loans on such properties, you can be assured they'll take an interest in the transaction. And they don't look favorably on fraud.

Commercial properties have whole other sets of regulations covering their exchange and use.

Tenants in almost all countries have certain rights independent of specific contractual clauses. Even Communist China, for example, has recently adopted legislation defining and protecting property rights. As an example, even in triple-net leases — an arrangement in which the lessee is responsible for maintenance, repairs, insurance, etc — landlords have to do more than simply collect a check each month.

Lenders are governed by complex rules that direct or restrict how much can be loaned, what paperwork is required in terms of title, insurance, even what kinds of advertising offering financing can be made.

Tax law introduces yet another layer of complexity into real estate investment. Very few autos or boats end up with tax liens against them, but it's hardly unknown in real estate deals to have to clear them before title can be passed.

So for those considering real estate investing, or beginning to become involved in one of the lowest risk, most potentially lucrative businesses around, one can offer no more sound advice than this: When it comes to real estate law, do your homework — before it's needed. It's much more expensive to do afterward.